Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
an increasing bizarre saga. congressman jesse jackson jr. resigned today. two weeks ago he was re-elected despite disappearing from public view days earlier. we learned he was being treated for a disease, now, a cloud. there is a federal investigation. here is nbc's kelly o'donnell. >> reporter: today, a once promising political career is officially over, with an end marked by spiraling legal troubles, jesse jr., the son of the famed civil rights leader, gave up his seat in congress after 17 years in a letter, he wrote in part, my health issues and treatment have become incompatible with service in the house of representatives. jackson has been in the hospital on and off since june for treatment of bipolar disorder, seen here while a patient at the mayo clinic. today, cook county officials are weighing options for a special election to replace jackson. >> and i think he feels that the district he represents, somebody should be there in a healthier condition than he is. >> reporter: but jackson makes striking admissions about his mistakes, talking to the justice department as they
was wilson, the one outlyer, bo jackson, the first athlete to be named an all-star in two major american sports, baseball and football. number 23, gubiza, announcer, heard the theory all day. >> i hope it is because they like the six in kansas city history. >> reporter: and while it is a coincidence, the baseball spring training is in arizona, where the other ticket was sold, at this suburb outside phoenix. again, the question here? who bought the winning ticket. >> yeah, yeah, this is excellent, i'm so surprised. it is wonderful, i would like to know who it is, because you know, fountain hills is a pretty small town and you know most everybody. >> reporter: there are strong indications here that the ticket sold here went to a local family. the wife bought it, ten dollars for the ticket. she has been unemployed. actually had a job interview today. she didn't go. a press conference is planned at the local high school here tomorrow. >> yeah, and who doesn't love a good juicy conspiracy theory. kerry sanders, thank you. dearborn, missouri on the interstate, thank you, kerry. >>> and up next
sixty. that could raise the number to sixty-five, and mr. and mrs. jackson, fifty-five, may not be eligible until they're sixty-six or older. but others say it would shift the costs to health care providers and private insurers. >> so as the private number pays more, the government saves money. but total costs rise. >> reporter: congresss could also change the means test, meaning seniors who earn more must pay more mrs. graham, for example, with income of less than 85,000 a year will pay a premium of 85 a month. her neighbors earning more than $85,000 a year, already pay up to $250 more a month in premiums. while only 5% pay higher in premiums, congress could raise the premiums or the co-pays on all seniors. but many are on a tight budget, the median income $22,000 a year. that is why many oppose the changes. >> we want to see the numbers lowered, not simply see the seniors pay more for health care. >> reporter: since nearly every senior will depend on medicare, any decision on eligibility of premiums and co-pays could affect millions. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>>
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3